Monday, March 9, 2015

SURRATT Smoky Eye Brush M

I was very intrigued by the shape of this particular eye shadow brush.  And though my head told me that it can't possibly work with how I like to work with applying eye shadows and smudging and smoking out around my eyes, darn it, it looked very intriguing.
The head of this brush is completely unique among my eye shadow brushes.  It has a long, very loosely bundled blue (grey) squirrel head that comes to a tapered point at the end.  The arrangement of the hair tips graduate from short to very long and gives it the most teeny tiny and soft tip.
While it does feel incredibly dreaming gently swishing this brush on my skin, the very soft looseness of the pointed tip is what makes this not a very useful brush for me.  In order to pick up any color on the bristles, I twirl and swirl the brush head on the eye shadow pan which picks up a very fine dusting of color.

For what I would infer from the name "smoky" I would have thought that I can get the diffused (but still noticeably intense) smoked haze of color around my eyes.  Could be my combination of particular eye shadows (I don't own any from the Surratt brand) and my application technique, but I could achieve the barest hint of color around my eyes.

Here is the Smoky Eye Brush M pictured with the SUQQU eye shadow brush L.   I thought the SUQQU L was floofy, but now I see the Surratt Smoky M has floofy to the max.  Something like the SUQQU, which airy in density has a more or less uniform level of density through out the head so that applying a wash of color is achievable as well as light blending.  I couldn't do that with the SURRATT.
I actually DID find a great use for this brush which works excellently with the contours of my eyes specifically.  I have a very shallow crease and have a tough time placing color there without amping up the intensity and looking overly made up.  The fine tip of the Surratt Smoky Eye Brush M, because of all the "faults" I described applies the faintest haze of color on the crease that looks already well blended with out any extra effort.
While this brush did have its moment of redemption, I don't think it was the best purchase for me.  First, I don't often apply color on the crease, preferring (oh how ironic!) a smokier look.  I generally like brushes that perform more than one limited function.  I think if you have very sensitive skin around the eyes, you might find some use for this delightful softness, but for those looking for workhorse eye shadow brushes, I would recommend other brushes in this line.  Namely, I think the Classic Eye Shadow brushes are amazing.

I purchased all my Surratt brushes in person at the counter on the Madison Avenue Barney's New York.  Joey is the counter manager and is wonderfully helpful.  (212) 833-2824

17 comments :

  1. Hmm, that's so interesting that you can only get the smallest dusting of eyeshadow onto the bristles! I find that mine picks up just enough, but I also use the sides by gently touching them to the surface of my shadows (mostly the loosely packed Inglots and RBR). But I do agree that it's so so soft that it's difficult to blend things precisely with it. I actually need to pull mine back out, I've been using the Zoeva ones recently!

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    1. There is definitely very little blending capability, especially in a small areas (like the lash line). The tip is too soft for any precise work. I'm pretty excited that it does work so well for the crease placement, though.

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  2. This brush won't work on my eye shape either. I probably need something with shorter hair for more control. This will just flop around my entire eye. Not a good look. LOL!

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    1. FLOP! Yes that's exactly how it is if you use too much pressure on the brush head. I need a very light hand when I am using it, just barely using the tip and a small amount of the top portion of the brush head. :D

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  3. This might work for highlighter/precise powdering! I need to try it ofr myself to be really sure, but if it doesn't work to deposit enough colour on the eye, a larger space might be the answer!

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    1. There's actually not a lot of precision because the tip is so floppy and imprecise! I wonder if the L version would be more useful, but honestly, don't want another one!

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  4. You know, when I look at this brush without reading your post for the first time, my thought is that this kind of brush is v. good as loose powder brush for setting under eye area/small pinpoint concealing/around the nose and such, not as much as smoky/eye blender -- just like The Procrastinator said! For blender, I can see why Suqqu is far more superior, in fact, I think I prefer my blender to be somewhat dense to blend better than floppy -- and this Surratt is bunny-ear floppy!

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    1. whoops, accidentally pressed the button before saying: I'm interested to see if this performs better with Surratt's own e/s because I do believe that brands design brushes and products in tandem.

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    2. Yes, I do know the brand designed the brushes to be used specifically with his products. I mentioned the slurry method of the powder in my response back to your RBR comment in the other post.
      It is awfully soft and floppy.

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  5. Belly, this is actually from the tail of the blue squirrel that you chase around.

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  6. ^ LOL to above.

    Aaactually, the medium smoky brush serves another function...*positions brush under your nostril and commences tickling* Wah...it would be helpful for Troy Surratt to post how-to videos in order to dispel creative albeit incorrect uses ;) BTdubs, I ordered the cheeky cheek brush, which is almost sold out online and completely sold out in store! Your posts might have launched a thousand hasty orders!

    - Josie

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    1. AHHHHH----CHOOO!

      I actually watched him demonstrate the brush and he did the swirl the brush around and then windshield wipe back and forth. Maybe it IS a matter of specific brand product to brush affinity. <___O He got much better color payoff, but I think the issue remains with teh FLOPPITY FLOP.

      Kekeke! JOSIE YOU GONNA WUVVVV THAT BRUSH! COOCHIECOOCHIEKOOO!

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  7. Yes, I am also curious how this would perform with Surrat eyeshadows! Do they keep the brushes at the counter Belly? Well, I have been going back and forth about getting the large Smoky, but I think I will just hold my horses and wait until I can try it in person. Is it bad that I really really want one of these just for the handle? I never thought I'd say this but I think I'm all brushed out at the moment. But I still want dem handles D:

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    1. I saw it demonstrated with Surratt shadows. He actually used a base of concealer on his hand in order for the shadow to show up clearly. I actually think that the design (flaw?) is to apply that "haze." Normally, I like my haze to be deeper close to the lashline and diffused going up to the brow. I can't for the life of me do that with this brush.

      I don't blame you re: the beautiful handle! It IS so pretty.... Also, did someone say "brushed out?!"

      *shakes imposter* Hey Hey Hey. Who are you and what did you do with our Cat?

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    2. I was drunk. I was high. I was tired. I was sleepwalking <----One or many of those things. IT WAS A MOMENT OF WEAKNESS :P

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    3. *sighs with palpable relief*
      You got me worried there... you joker. DON"T DO THAT AGIN.

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